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Find a Fire Station Using the CKFR District Map

CKFR Overview

CKFR, located in the central portion of the County, is one of the largest fire service providers in Kitsap County. Within its boundaries and contracted areas CKFR provides Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) response to approximately 115 square miles of land and serves a population of more than 72,000 citizens. In addition, CKFR is the County’s fastest growing fire agency as a result of a series of mergers, consolidations and contracts for fire and EMS protection services. Because of its peninsula type layout, CKFR has 40 miles of tidal waterfront with adjacent saltwater area plus numerous small lakes and ponds. The area is experiencing a steady but rapid growth rate. The economy is stable, generally because of the diversification of its economic base.

History

In 1942, the citizens in the Silverdale area petitioned for the formation of a fire district to protect their area. The voters in the area approved the ballot and Kitsap County Fire Protection District #1 was formed. In 1949, the citizens of North Perry (East Bremerton area) formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #9. In 1952, the citizens of Tracyton formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #11, and in 1954, the citizens of Brownsville formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #15.

In 1977, District #11 merged into District #15 and a new facility was built with Trident impact funds in the Meadowdale area. In 1989, District #9 merged with District #15. In 1999, Fire District #15 merged with District #1 and became Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue (CKFR). On January 1, 2003 Kitsap County Fire District #12 officially merged with CKFR.

  • 1942

    Petition for the formation of a fire district.

  • 1949

    North Perry formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #9.

  • 1952

    Tracyton formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #11.

  • 1954

    Brownsville formed Kitsap County Fire Protection District #15.

  • 1977

    District #11 merged into District #15.

  • 1989

    District #9 merged with District #15.

  • 1999

    District #15 merged with District #1 and became CKFR.

  • 2003

    Kitsap County Fire District #12 merged with CKFR.

Description of the Fire District

The Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue District covers approximately 115 square miles. The District’s boundaries are described as follows:

Beginning at the Mason County line and Hood Canal, North along the water through Holly, Seabeck, and Olympic View to Sub Base Bangor, then East along Mountain View Road to Port Orchard Narrows at Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC), then South through Brownsville, Illahee, Illahee State Park, to Enetai Beach and Bremerton City limits, then Northwest along Bremerton City limits along Petersville Road, then West along Riddell Road, then South along the eastern side past Roswell Drive, then West to Pine Road, and meandering South to Bremerton City limits near Lions Field, then Northwest along East side of Dyes Inlet through Tracyton up to Silverdale, then South along the West side to Jackson Park Naval, then South along Lakehurst drive to Kitsap Way and then West through the Gold Mountain area, then meandering West and South to the Mason County line, and then West to Hood Canal.

Communities recognized as being in CKFR are Silverdale, Seabeck, Illahee, Lake Symington, Lake Tahuyeh, Island Lake, Crosby, Hintzville, Gilberton, Meadowdale, North Perry, Chico, Wildcat Lake, Kitsap Lake, and Erlands Point.

Resource Distribution

CKFR, located in the central portion of the County, is one of the largest fire service providers in Kitsap County. Within its boundaries and contracted areas CKFR provides Fire and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) response to approximately 115 square miles of land and serves a population of 72,000 citizens. In addition, CKFR is the County’s fastest growing fire agency as a result of a series of mergers, consolidations and contracts for Fire and EMS protection services. Because of its peninsula type layout, CKFR has 40 miles of tidal waterfront with adjacent saltwater area plus numerous small lakes and ponds. The area is experiencing a steady but rapid growth rate. The economy is stable, generally because of the diversification of its economic base.